Mitsubishi dealers see an ally in Diaz

Fred Diaz is no stranger to the North American auto market. Automaker Mitsubishi announced earlier this week that the company has hired Diaz as their President and CEO of their North America business. Diaz will start at the company on April 1 and current President of Mitsubishi Motors North America, Ryujro Kobashi, will head to the company’s Japanese headquarters. He will be placed in charge of overseas sales.

Fred Diaz, 52, came to the automaker nearly eight months ago after nearly 30 years as an executive at multiple automotive companies. His prior position was as General Manager of Performance Optimization for the global marketing and sales division of Mitsubishi Motors. He mostly recently spent 4 years as the a senior level executive at Nissan and prior to that, he was the CEO of Ram and Chrysler de Mexico and Latin America. His knowledge of the automotive industry is perhaps bested by very few.

Diaz has in depth knowledge of the North and South American auto market and is expected to help the automaker expand their dealership network. He will be tasked with completing the company’s three-year plan for growth that it recently announced. The goal is to increase their by 30%, from 100,000 units to 130,000 units. They are currently the fastest growing non-luxury brand in the United States. He will also be expected to help launch the company’s electric and hybrid arm, something the company has been lacking in. Diaz has a bachelor’s degree from Texas Lutheran University and a MBA from Central Michigan University.

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Emily Daniel
Emily Daniel experienced childhood in a games auto arranged family. She has composed for an assortment of auto magazines and sites, Green Auto Shop boss among them. Emily has chipped away at prominent driving recreations as a substance master, notwithstanding working for aviation organizations and programming monsters. She right now lives in a protected, undisclosed area in the American southwestern leave.